User Story

Title

Create Engaging Scenarios with Moodle Quiz

While Moodle quizzes are often used for summative assessment, quizzes can also be used to engage learners in scenarios. Instructors can use scenarios to scaffold the learning experience and allow students to practice skills.

While Moodle quizzes are often used for summative assessment, quizzes can also be used to engage learners in scenarios. Instructors can use scenarios to scaffold the learning experience and allow students to practice skills.

Challenge

Students and full-time employees who staff the OIT Help Desk must be very knowledgeable about technologies used by faculty, staff, and students at the University of Minnesota. However, excellent communication is just as important, and that requires higher order thinking skills. To prepare to communicate effectively, the help desk staff practice with scenarios created with the Moodle Quiz Tool.

Solution

Rebecca George-Bandy is a technology trainer responsible for designing and implementing a training program for Help Desk employees. She uses ungraded Moodle quizzes to engage learners in scenarios that replicate communication between Help Desk employees and their clients.

In this skill-building exercise, learners evaluate content for effective communication strategies, and get immediate feedback on their choices. They are then challenged to create a stronger customer communication piece for the situation. For example, in this particular quiz, learners are presented with a scenario that provides context for the communication ("Additional Comments"), and they see a written response to a client.

Question #1 (Moodle All-or-Nothing Multiple Choice question) asks them to identify all the ways in which the communication fails to adhere to required guidelines. Learners may review the guidelines via a link that is embedded in the scenario. They have three opportunities to get as many correct answers as they can. For each attempt at these multiple choice questions, Moodle saves and displays any correct answers that the learner has selected and erases the wrong answers that have been selected, for each of the four opportunities the learner has with this question.

Sample Moodle All-or-Nothing Multiple Choice question

Sample Moodle All-or-Nothing Multiple Choice question with feedback displaying

Question #2 (Moodle Essay question) asks learners to rewrite the comments in order to correct the errors. Note that the criteria that they selected in Question 1 remain open and visible. When they submit their quizzes, they get immediate feedback in the form of an "ideal" passage. Within a week of submitting their answers, they will receive specific feedback from the facilitator.

Sample Moodle Essay question

Sample response to a Moodle Essay question

Additional scenarios replicate the movement from multiple choice to essay question.
Review the Moodle Quiz settings that make this approach successful.

Outcome

The Quiz tool is both powerful and versatile. George-Bandy uses multiple choice and essay questions to scaffold the experience for students who move from identification to analysis and application. The tool provides multiple opportunities for feedback. Immediate, generic feedback that students see as they move through the quiz can be reinforced by tailored and specific feedback from the instructor after the quiz has been submitted. Learners also have the option to take the quiz multiple times until they achieve mastery. When students take the quiz multiple times George-Bandy can change the questions by drawing from a pool of questions.