Resources

Good Practices

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Resources

Content chunking, for instructional design, is the strategy of breaking up content into shorter, bite-size pieces that are more manageable and easier to remember.
In a recent study, researchers identified the design factors that were most valued by participants in terms of promoting an engaging online learning experience.
The best discussions keep everyone active, either by sharing or thinking. Even those students who rarely, if ever, contribute can still participate in other ways.
This presentation will introduce a rubric-based method of auditing online courses for their maturity on three dimensions of development. 
This guide consists of introductory comments, worksheets, and action questions in each of the three major phases of Integrated Course Design.
Brief presentation on when and how to use rubrics for grading from Academic Technology Support Services (ATSS) at the University of MInnesota.
The challenge addressed in this article is how to achieve a win-win balance between quality and workload for students and instructors participating in asynchronous online discussions.
The Book module makes it easy to create multi-page resources with a book-like format.
Building branched scenarios with your rapid elearning tools is actually pretty easy to do.  These tutorials shows you how to do so.
Chunking is a concept embedded in the world of instructional and information design.
The central message of this book is that there ways of creating learning experiences that can sufficiently impact the outcomes for students and instructors.
This online book shares the stories of those who are using the principles of Integrated Course Design; you will learn "how different people are applying these ideas in multiple contexts and what happens when they do."
The purpose of this page is to promote the design and administration of online exams that inhibit cheating and prevent the unauthorized distribution of exam materials by use of effective practices in the following are
This study explores the affordances and limitations of an online virtual classroom.
This tutorial familiarizes faculty and staff with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the importance of protecting a student’s educational record.
This article, from Carnegie Mellon's Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation, describes the differences between formative and summative assessments.
University of Minnesota's policies and instructions on grades and grading from Onestop.
Guidelines for grading and grading policies from the Center for Educational Innovation at the University of Minnesota.
Resource on a variety of different grading systems with criteria on when each is appropriate from the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) at the Univeristy of Minnesota.
Group discussion in online statistics courses
Chunking is a concept that originates from the field of cognitive psychology.
The key is to design tasks that are truly collaborative, meaning the students will benefit more from doing the activity as a group than doing it alone.
Presence is the most important best practice for an online course. Learn techniques to establish instructor presence.
Canvas is the University's new enterprise learning management system. 
To be effective, online curricula illustrating communication behaviors need face-to-face interaction, individual role play with feedback and discussion.
Access group work resources from this past Educause concurrent session.
The University protects the rights of students with respect to their education records.
This page contains detailed information about how the Moodle Lifecycle Process affects
This page contains detailed information about how the Moodle Lifecycle Process affects Moodle for Academic
Online discussions are a great tool to extend classroom conversations and learning by getting students to engage with class material online.
The use of discussion forums as a vehicle for learning is based on the pedagogical tenets of collaborative learning theory, which call for collaboration between participants, experimentation, and open inquiry.
The Office of eLearning provides faculty and staff support for Quality Matters,
How to setup and use REEF Polling by i>clicker so that you can use your laptop, smart phone, or tablet to answer questions in class and review the material afterwards.
This source provides samples of branching scenarios for different professions.
Tips and tricks to help you record quality videos with your smartphone.
Strategies for effective group work in the Online Class.
We discuss a teaching approach that we believe promotes deep learning and diminishes the powerful voice of the teacher, thereby allowing students and the teacher to reason actively and inquire together in the cl
A resource for students who are assigned group work for their courses.
The article discusses the use of asynchronous and synchronous online discussion in education.
This study focuses on learner experiences in a real-time communication mediated by the Breeze web-based collaboration system. It also combined conference mediums. 
The College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) created this checklist to help instructors create effective online courses.
Learn how to set up a branching scenario properly, no matter what tool you decide to develop it in.
Get an overview for instructors and presenters on the Turning Technologies site.
Learn how to set up and use TurningPoint Cloud software and receiver connection.
In this paper two collaborative activities are explored, namely a simple Case Study (moderate level of structuredness) and the Case Study joint with the Jigsaw (higher level of structuredness).
When should you go to the trouble of designing a branching scenario? See some examples.
On this web page, provided by the Center for Writing, you’ll find successful approaches to teaching students how to use sources appropriately and to avoid plagiarism.