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Duo Security Two-Factor Authentication

The University uses a two-factor authentication system for users who need access to its enterprise-level applications (e.g., CS PeopleSoft, EFS PeopleSoft, EDMS, and the Data Warehouse) and for the underlying servers and databases. A form of authentication stronger than just a password, two-factor authentication requires two factors to authenticate: something you have, and something you know.

What is Duo Security? 

In the past, two-factor authentication solutions have used hardware tokens (or “fobs”) that users needed to carry, but Duo Security’s two-factor authentication solution uses your mobile device to help verify your identity. This is a substantial improvement since your mobile device is something you already have, know how to use, and are likely to notice if it’s missing. If a mobile device isn’t available a landline phone can be used instead (hardware tokens are also available). Using a combination of your Internet Password and Duo Security helps prevent an attacker from accessing secure information, even if they know your password. 

Which Method is Right for Me?

There are a number of different methods for logging in. Use whichever method is most convenient for you. You can even enroll multiple devices and use multiple methods as a backup in case the device you normally use to log in is ever lost, damaged, or simply unavailable.

DetailsMethod

Duo Mobile Push

Duo Mobile Passcodes

SMS Passcodes

Hardware Tokens

Phone Callback
DescriptionDuo sends a login request to your phone. Just tap Approve to authenticate.Generate passcodes with Duo's free mobile application.Receive a batch of passcodes via SMS.Use the passcode generated on your hardware token. Email help@umn.edu or call 1-HELP (612-301-4357) to request a token.Duo calls your phone. Just press any key to authenticate.
PlatformsiOS
Android
Blackberry
Windows Mobile
Duo Push platforms, as well as Palm, Windows Mobile, and J2ME/SymbianAll phones with SMSAll phones
Usable Offline?

More Questions?